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December 1, 2016

India inks Rs 5,000 crore deal with US for 145 M777 howitzers


Breaking the Bofors jinx, India and the US today inked a nearly Rs. 5,000 crore deal for 145 M777 ultra-light howitzers, which will be mostly deployed near the borders with China. This is the first deal for artillery guns since the Bofors scandal in 1980s.”India has today signed the Letter of Acceptance which formalises the contract between India and US for these guns,” sources said.
The deal for 145 American ultra-light howitzers, costing about Rs. 5,000 crore was recently cleared by the Cabinet Committee on Security (CCS). The deal was inked as a two-day meeting of the 15th India-US Military Cooperation Group (MCG) began in Delhi. India-US MCG is a forum established to progress Defence Cooperation between HQ Integrated Defence Staff and US Pacific Command at the strategic and operational levels.
 The meeting commenced with the US Co-Chair Lt Gen David H Berger, Commander US Marine Corps Forces, Pacific calling on Lt Gen Satish Dua, CISC, HQ IDS. The MCG meeting is co-chaired by Air Marshal AS Bhonsle DCIDS (Operations), HQ IDS. A 260-member delegation from the US Defence Forces and several officers from the three Services HQ and HQ IDS representing the Indian side are attending the bilateral event. On the issue of M777, the sources said India had sent a Letter of Request to the US government showing interest in buying the guns which will be deployed in high-altitude areas in Arunachal Pradesh and Ladakh, bordering China.
The US had responded with a Letter of Acceptance (LOA) and the Defence Ministry had in June looked into the terms and conditions and approved it. The offsets, under which BAE Systems, manufacturer of the gun, will invest about USD 200 million, will be pursued independently. While 25 guns will come to India in a fly-away condition, the rest will be assembled at the proposed Assembly Integration and Test facility for the weapon system in India in partnership with Mahindra. The first two howitzers will be delivered within six months of the contract being inked, while rest will be delivered at the rate of two per month. The howitzers that can be heli-lifted were first proposed to be bought from BAE about 10 years back.

 economictimes
Breaking the Bofors jinx, India and the US today inked a nearly Rs. 5,000 crore deal for 145 M777 ultra-light howitzers, which will be mostly deployed near the borders with China. This is the first deal for artillery guns since the Bofors scandal in 1980s.”India has today signed the Letter of Acceptance which formalises the contract between India and US for these guns,” sources said.The deal for 145 American ultra-light howitzers, costing about Rs. 5,000 crore was recently cleared by the Cabinet Committee on Security (CCS). The deal was inked as a two-day meeting of the 15th India-US Military Cooperation Group (MCG) began in Delhi. India-US MCG is a forum established to progress Defence Cooperation between HQ Integrated Defence Staff and US Pacific Command at the strategic and operational levels. The meeting commenced with the US Co-Chair Lt Gen David H Berger, Commander US Marine Corps Forces, Pacific calling on Lt Gen Satish Dua, CISC, HQ IDS. The MCG meeting is co-chaired by Air Marshal AS Bhonsle DCIDS (Operations), HQ IDS. A 260-member delegation from the US Defence Forces and several officers from the three Services HQ and HQ IDS representing the Indian side are attending the bilateral event. On the issue of M777, the sources said India had sent a Letter of Request to the US government showing interest in buying the guns which will be deployed in high-altitude areas in Arunachal Pradesh and Ladakh, bordering China. The US had responded with a Letter of Acceptance (LOA) and the Defence Ministry had in June looked into the terms and conditions and approved it. The offsets, under which BAE Systems, manufacturer of the gun, will invest about USD 200 million, will be pursued independently. While 25 guns will come to India in a fly-away condition, the rest will be assembled at the proposed Assembly Integration and Test facility for the weapon system in India in partnership with Mahindra. The first two howitzers will be delivered within six months of the contract being inked, while rest will be delivered at the rate of two per month. The howitzers that can be heli-lifted were first proposed to be bought from BAE about 10 years back.

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November 30, 2016

Russian PAK FA to get newly-designed engine



The first ground-based ignition for the second stage of the engine for the Prospective Airborne Complex of Frontline Aviation (PAK FA T-50 aircraft) has been successfully conducted by United Engine Corporation (UEC), a part of Rostec state holding company.

The United Engine Corporation (UEC) has successfully conducted the first ground-based ignition of the second stage of the engine for the Prospective Airborne Complex of Frontline Aviation (PAK FA T-50 aircraft). The UEC is part of the Rostec state holding company.
Gas generators had to be prepared for the testing, along with the demonstrator engine.

What is the PAK FA flying with now?
The PAK FA is currently using a first stage engine, a modernized Al-41.
Pavel Bulat, avionics specialist and head of the Kupol Group of Companies, said the AI-41 is an updated version of the engines used for the Su-27, Su-30 and other models in that series.
“The engine for the T-50 was significantly upgraded from the original models, incorporating the latest control system, compressors, and so on. Nevertheless, it still falls short of the 5th generation model, and is very noticeable on radar screens,” said the expert.
The new second-stage engine is one of the most advanced in the world, said Bulat. It enables the T-50 to accelerate to supersonic speed, and maintain that velocity throughout the flight, without using afterburners.
“The speed will be as much as Mach 1.6 (about 1,200 mph), depending on the terrain over which the flight is taking place. The engine will also significantly improve the stealth properties of the PAK FA, thanks to the use of new composite materials,” said Bulat.
The designers expect to start testing the new engine on fighter jets in 2018, and for the motor to be fully integrated in 2020.
“In addition to the engine, the radar station also needs to be modified, and engineers need to remove the last deficiencies in the airframe concept, which, among all the aircraft flying today, is the most modern in the world,” said the analyst.
New fighter's weapons
30-mm cannon
The firing unit comprises of the 9-A1-4071K, one of the lightest cannon in its class, which is designed to destroy armoured vehicles or armoured enemy targets. During one flight, the pilot can shoot 150 rounds from the 30-mm cannon.The new weapon is a modified single-barrel GSh-301 aircraft cannon, used in Russian fighters and bombers.
Aircraft bombs
The future T-50 5th generation fighter will also carry high-explosive and volume-detonating bombs, Sergey Rusakov, General Director of the Techmash Group, stated on September 22.
Rusakov said they were considering high-explosive incendiary OFZAB-500 aviation bombs for the PAK FA, and volume-detonating ODAB-500PMV, currently being used in Russian operations in Syria. Engineers have already produced a set of warheads for future tests.

Operational principle and the use of bombs in Syria
According to the rearmament programme, Russian Armed Forces will receive a batch of 12 T-50 fighters before the end of this year. A new contract for the supply of 5th generation aircraft will be discussed with the Ministry of Defence at the end of 2016, after which the War Department will decide how many new aircraft are needed.
The newest Russian fighter aircraft was built as the main competitor to the F-22 Raptor. The American stealth fighter distinguished itself during the Iraq War.
“The T-50 will go into serial production much later than the Raptor. This allows us to take into consideration all the pros and cons of the existing aircraft when constructing our own fighter. A similar situation existed when we were working on the multi-purpose 4th generation Su-27 fighter. The prototype of that domestic aircraft came out much later than the American F-16, and took into account the shortcomings of its precursor. As a result, the domestic Sukhoi was able to beat the ‘American,’ in terms of combat characteristics,” Vadim Kozyulin, Professor at the Academy of Military Sciences, told RIR.
The expert noted that the T-50 would be able to use the full range of existing high-precision air-to-air missiles, as well as all precision-guided munitions. “As part of the ‘stealth’ concept, special missiles for the PAK FA are being developed, with a square cross section that will allow more warheads to be carried in hatches during combat missions,” Kozyulin added.
Operational principle and the use of bombs in Syria
According to the rearmament programme, Russian Armed Forces will receive a batch of 12 T-50 fighters before the end of this year. A new contract for the supply of 5th generation aircraft will be discussed with the Ministry of Defence at the end of 2016, after which the War Department will decide how many new aircraft are needed.
The newest Russian fighter aircraft was built as the main competitor to the F-22 Raptor. The American stealth fighter distinguished itself during the Iraq War.
“The T-50 will go into serial production much later than the Raptor. This allows us to take into consideration all the pros and cons of the existing aircraft when constructing our own fighter. A similar situation existed when we were working on the multi-purpose 4th generation Su-27 fighter. The prototype of that domestic aircraft came out much later than the American F-16, and took into account the shortcomings of its precursor. As a result, the domestic Sukhoi was able to beat the ‘American,’ in terms of combat characteristics,” Vadim Kozyulin, Professor at the Academy of Military Sciences, told RIR.
The expert noted that the T-50 would be able to use the full range of existing high-precision air-to-air missiles, as well as all precision-guided munitions. “As part of the ‘stealth’ concept, special missiles for the PAK FA are being developed, with a square cross section that will allow more warheads to be carried in hatches during combat missions,” Kozyulin added.

 rbth

Rafale's serviceability rate is 48.5% compared with Su-30 MKI's 60%


The serviceability rate of the Dassault Rafale fighter jet in service with the French Air Force is 48.5%, according to information given to a French lawmaker by the government.
The serviceability rate or the availability rate is the number of aircraft ready for missions at any given time. In the case of the French Air Force’s Rafale jets, nearly half of the fleet is on the ground undergoing repairs or maintenance, Jane’s reported on 24 November 2016.
According to the Janes report, the official record for France's Dassault Rafale fighter fleet in 2015 (93 aircraft in service with the air force) with a budgeted maintenance cost of EUR343.90 million ($364.56 million). This information was given to a lawmaker which Jane’s did not identify.
The figure presents an interesting proposition as Dassault, through the French government is reported to have promised in its deal with India that it will ensure that there is 75 percent serviceability, i.e 27 aircraft are operationally available at any given time of the 36 that India has orders. “There will be steep penalties if they don’t adhere to timelines,” unnamed sources were quoted as saying by the Hindu on 23 September this year. India concluded an Inter-Governmental Agreement (IGA) with France for the purchase of 36 Rafale fighter jets at a cost of €7.87 billion on the same day.
In contrast the Su-30MKI fleet with the Indian Air Force has an operational availability between 55-60 percent which gives it a higher serviceability than the Rafale jets in service with the French AF.

 The Indian MoD has been in negotiations with the Russian manufacturer of the Su-30 jet to raise the serviceability to 70-75 per cent.
Dassault will begin aircraft deliveries after 36 months and complete in 67 months.
The deliveries of Dassault Rafale fighter jets India ordered will commence from September 2019 with the French government and Dassault committed to providing depot-level maintenance during the pendency of the contract to ensure a high serviceability rate.

defenceworld


IAF's upgraded Jaguar DARIN III aircraft gets operation clearance


In a significant milestone for the country's military aviation sector, the upgraded Jaguar DARIN III twin-seat aircraft has received Initial Operation Clearance (IOC).

Deputy Chief of IAF, Air Marshal R K S Bhadauria, who flew the aircraft at HAL airport here recently, announced the satisfactory completion of IOC.

Test Pilot of Aircraft & Systems Testing Establishment, Wg Cdr V Prabhakaran was his co-pilot.

HAL CMD, T Suvarna Raju said the aircraft is now equipped with world class avionics system.

Congratulating those involved in achieving the milestone, Air Marshal Bhadauria said the DARIN III Upgrade was one of best upgrades in terms of data handling and overall capabilities.

The total design and development covering system requirement capture, specification preparation, software, hardware, electrical and mechanical design and development were carried out indigenously at HAL's Mission and Combat System Research and Design Centre (MCSRDC) and aircraft modification was done at Overhaul Division, added Raju.

Director (Engg and R & D),D K Venkatesh, ASTE Commandant Air Vice Marshal Sandeep Singh, and other senior executives witnessed the flight.

Besides HAL, certification agencies, trial team of ASTE and other agencies were involved in the upgrade programme.

Three DARIN I Standard Jaguars have been upgraded to DARIN III Standard by HAL.

The upgrade incorporates new state-of-the-art avionics architecture including the Open System Architecture Mission Computer (OSAMC), Fire Control Radar, Solid State Digital Video Recording System (SSDVRS), Autopilot with Alt Select & HNAV and Identification of Friend or Foe (IFF) and more.

pti ,brahmand

November 29, 2016

India Could Develop Combat Drone Engine With Help From Safran


Safran has offered to partner India’s Defense Research and Development Organization (DRDO) in the development of a variant of the indigenous Kaveri engine for its combat drone, ‘Ghatak’.
The French company which manufactures engines for Rafale fighter jets are waiting for an approval by the Union government.
“We are working on technologies required for ‘Ghatak’ with about Rs 230 crore ($33.5 million) sanctioned as part of pre-project studies,” S. Christopher, Director General, DRDO, and Secretary, Department of Defence R&D, Ministry of Defence (MoD) was quoted as saying by Deccan Chronicle Sunday.
Safran’s offer could help accelerate the development of Kaveri engine to power ‘Tejas’ (Light Combat Aircraft) fighter jets. So far, an expenditure of about Rs 2,100 crores ($306 million) was incurred on Kaveri engine by Gas Turbine Research Establishment (GTRE), Bengaluru, over last three decades. In case the government approves collaboration with Safran, the French engine maker would contribute about Rs 500 crore to Rs 600 crore ($73 million to $87 million) and ensure certification of engines within the next 18 months for ‘Ghatak,’ ‘Tejas’ and Advanced Medium Combat Aircraft (AMCA), Christopher added.

defenceworld

November 24, 2016

India signs $1.4bn contracts with Israel


India quietly signed two contracts worth $1.4bn with Israel Aerospace Industries for the purchase of two additional Phalcon/IL-76 Airborne Early Warning and Control Systems (AWACS) valued at $1 billion  and 10 Heron TP unmanned air vehicles (UAVs) during the recent visit of Israeli President Reuven Rivil to India.
The contracts were signed in New Delhi on 16th November in the presence of  Brig. Gen. (Retd) Mishel Ben Baruch, Director, SIBAT, Israel Ministry of Defence and Indian defence secretary G Mohan Kumar.
An Indian Air force (IAF) official said the purchase of two AWACS has been pending for the past five years and the deliveries should be made within the next two to three years. “Phalcon AWACS are tremendous force-multipliers and we are having an excellent experience with them,” the official added.
A $400m contract for the purchase of 10 weaponised Heron TP UAVs was also signed with IAI. Deliveries to the IAF are expected to be completed over the next three years.
According to the IAF official, the Indian Heron TPs will have very sophisticated communication & intelligence systems, detection finders, signal parameters and emitter classification and geo-location capabilities, in addition to electronic surveillance measure for long-range automatic detection and identification of emitting targets.
The official added that Indian Heron TPs will be capable of launching guided munitions and lightweight tactical missiles. Currently the three Indian defence forces operate around 60 Heron UAVs but it is not known whether they are weaponised or not. The three Indian defence forces have a joint requirement of over 200 weaponised UAVs in the next 10 years.
IAI has also given a proposal to India’s Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) to jointly develop an advanced version of Heron UAV in India. However, the ruling National Democratic Alliance government wants all future UAV requirements to be met through the Make in India initiative. Israeli Searcher Mark 1 & II, Heron and Heop UAVs are currently used by Indian defence forces.

 aircosmosinternational

November 23, 2016

Reconnaissance drone to be fitted on the Armata


Reconnaissance drones, capable of scanning the battlefield dozens of kilometres in all directions and providing a clear view and help direct weapons and rockets toward targets Combat, will be fitted on vehicles of the Armata family. These drones, developed by the Moscow Aviation Institute (MAI), can stay in the air indefinitely, as they have no on-board battery. Power is supplied to them through the flexible tether cable from the combat vehicle.
The ‘Pterodactyl’ is a lightweight drone with a shell made of composite materials, connected to the combat vehicle with a flexible cable. The Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) will hover within a radius of 50-100 metres around the combat vehicle and climb to a height of several dozen metres. The ‘Pterodactyl’ will be equipped with radar and a thermal imaging camera.
“The development work continues, but around a year from now, we will send samples for testing to the Defence Ministry,” said Vitaly Polyansky, Senior Research Fellow of the Air Robotics Systems Department of the MAI. “At the moment, we are working on making the drone lighter and increasing its load carrying capacity, but the key element – the tethered system has already been tested in our laboratory, and has fully confirmed all assigned characteristics,” Polyansky told Izvestia.
Compared with drones that are controlled by radio, the Pterodactyl can stay in the air much longer and carry more equipment on board, because it does not have to carry any batteries. Another advantage of the tethered management system, is complete protection against eavesdropping.
Another feature which makes the Pterodactyl unique is that it is made using the tilt-rotor scheme: the aircraft’s propellers can be rotated along with its wings. This allows for the advantages of a helicopter and an aircraft combined in one machine. As a result, the drone can reach high speeds in the air, moving with the tank at full speed, while it is able to levitate in a small area, including directly over the hull of the vehicle.
“The idea of ​​an unmanned intelligence aircraft, managed on a flexible cable, is not new – the first time such a device was used was at the end of the 1960s on a West German unmanned helicopter, the Dornier Do-32K. It was managed by a cable and also received its fuel the same way,” military expert Oleg Zheltonozhko told Izvestia. “Currently, a cable interface is used on the Israeli copter Hovermast, but it is not used as part of a combat vehicle.”
Zheltonozhko said a system in which the reconnaissance drone is directly part of the combat vehicle, does not yet exist.
“The use of a light UAV, equipped with a thermal imaging camera and radar, as an external monitoring system, seems a logical solution for future armoured vehicles, the range of which exceeds the visual range of onboard detection equipment,” said the expert. “For example, the main weapon of the Armata can hit a target at a distance of 8 km, while the recognition of an enemy tank through the sighting channel is limited to 5 km. Because of the Pterodactyl, the tank crew can see the situation on the battlefield, while staying hidden in a shelter or behind buildings or uneven terrain,” he explained.
Zheltonozhko also said that equipping armoured vehicles with external surveillance systems, will enable them to survey the area for a distance of at least 10 km, will provide the Armata with distinct advantages over any of the existing equipment the opponents may possess.

 rbth

With India in MTCR, BrahMos range to be more lethal


Soon after India attended its first plenary meeting as a member of the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR), the Indian and Russian governments decided to extend the range of the supersonic BrahMos cruise missile, which would make it even more lethal.
 The governments of India and Russia agreed to extend the range of the BrahMos supersonic cruise missile, doubling it to 600 kilometres, soon after India attended the 30th plenary session of the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) as a full member.
Sources confirmed to RIR this week that the two countries had agreed, in principle, to increase the range of the BrahMos to almost double its current capacity. However, they denied that India’s membership of the MTCR was directly related to the decision.
An official source categorically said to RIR that increasing the range of the missile was “not, in any way, in contravention to the MTCR.”
According to an official with the Indian Ministry of Defence (MoD) quoted by ‘Defence News,’ a definitive portal on defence-related news and opinion, it had become possible to extend the range of the joint venture BrahMos cruise missile because of India's entry into the Missile Technology Control Regime.

India attended the 30th plenary session of the MTCR held in Busan (South Korea), from October 17 to 21, 2016, for the first time as a member. India joined the MTCR earlier this year, in June.
The MTCR aims to restrict proliferation of missiles, complete rocket systems, unmanned air vehicles and related technology for those systems capable of carrying a 500 kilogramme payload for at least 300 kilometres, as well as systems intended for the delivery of weapons of mass destruction (WMD).
India's entry into the MTCR will help to the extent that Russia and India can acknowledge that the range is above 300 kms.  It has been believed that the range of the BrahMos was specified at 290 kms primarily to avoid complications for Moscow in the transfer of technology and materials for the BrahMos, since Russia has long been a signatory to the MTCR.  BrahMos's range means it falls short of the 300km limit set by the MTCR.
Being a signatory to MTCR does not imply that there are no restrictions in missile technology transfer and trade, particularly when range and lethality are involved.
In this context, sources told RIR that China was not a member of the MTCR and had transferred some missiles to Pakistan, among others (including North Korea) which exceeded the prescribed range of 300kms.
The sources pointed out that India and Russia would not be violating any laws because they were not exporting the extended range missiles but, as members of the MTCR, they could extend the range as the BrahMos was a jointly developed missile and this would be “a natural extension” of joint research efforts.
The agreement to extend the range was among those taken on October 26 at the 16th  Indo-Russian Intergovernmental Commission on Military-Technical Cooperation (IRIGC-MTC), co-chaired by Indian Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar and his Russian counterpart, Gen. Sergei Shoigu.
The defence ministers at the meeting reviewed decisions taken by the leaders (President Vladimir Putin and Prime Minister Narendra Modi) during the India-Russia summit in Goa, and looked at ways to expedite the agreements while looking at further areas to move ahead.
Defence News quoted a scientist with the Indian Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) who said, "only very minor changes in software and hardware are required" to increase the range of the supersonic missile. 
“BrahMos is a world-class weapons system and there is no equivalent in the world today. Speed, precision and power, all exists in this system," Praveen Pathak, a spokesman for the manufacturing firm BrahMos Aerospace Limited told Sputnik.
BrahMos Aerospace, co-owned by the Indian and Russian governments, manufactures the supersonic cruise missile, named after two rivers, the Brahmaputra and the Moskva.
Since BrahMos conforms to the characteristics of the Russian P-800 Oniks/Yakhont anti-ship missile, no major modification is required to achieve 600-kilometres range, said Rahul Bhonsle, a retired Brigadier and Editor of ‘Strategic Foresight Asia’ which closely follows and covers all defence-related issues. Modifications to the missile would, however, be required to provide greater stability over the longer range and corresponding accuracy.
Bhonsle said operationally, the increase in range would overcome restrictions of deployment for the ground based version of the missile. “This will extend the area of influence as well as provide greater flexibility in employment. On the other hand, for the naval and the yet to be deployed air launched version (to be fitted on to the Su-35MKI) this will provide the advantage of extension of range in engagement as well as standoff distance,” the military analyst pointed out.
A source told RIR that the move was still at the planning stage and it would be several years before the project was fulfilled, but declined to specify any time frame.

 rbth

India bolsters Western Fleet ASW capability with Kolkata destroyer


The Indian Navy will assign the newly inducted Project 15A Kolkata-class guided-missile destroyer, INS Chennai, to the service's Western Naval Command, the country's defence ministry confirmed in a statement on 21 November.
Chennai, which was commissioned in Mumbai on the same day, is the navy's third Kolkata platform, and the last Project 15A variant in the class.
According to IHS Jane's Fighting Ships, Chennai is 163.95 m long, 17.71 m in beam, and has a 5.4 m draught. It has a top speed of 32 kt, and a standard range of 4,500 n miles at 18 kt.
With a prominent anti-submarine warfare (ASW) capability, the ship's submarine prosecution capacity is provided by indigenously developed twin-tube torpedo launchers, Russian made RBU-6000 rocket launchers, and the HUMSA-NG hull-mounted sonar.
IHS Jane's reported on 21 November that the platform is entering service without its Atlas Elektronik low-frequency Active Towed-Array Sonar (ACTAS) system, although this is expected to be fitted "soon", according to Indian Navy spokesperson Captain D K Sharma.
Upon completing further sea trials, Chennai will be homeported in Mumbai on India's western coast.

janes

November 22, 2016

Parrikar sees need for rethink of submarine building plan


The country should rethink its submarine building programme and expand its fleet beyond the planned 24, Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar said on Tuesday.
This represents a major change in policy with growing underwater strength of Pakistan and China in the Indian Ocean.
The Minister was speaking at a joint Navy-FICCI seminar, ‘Current and future challenges in design and construction of underwater vessels’.
The government had approved an ambitious “30-year submarine construction plan” in 1999 for building 24 conventional submarines till 2030. This was later converted to include nuclear attack submarines as well.
“We need to rethink about the real requirement based on our projection… We also need to assure that the skilled manpower and skills developed we need to retain it. To retain it, we need to have more construction of submarines,” Mr. Parrikar said.

Critically short of submarines

However the plan has been delayed with only one programme approved so far — Project-75 — for six Scorpenes being built under by the Mazgaon Docks Limited (MDL) with technology transfer from DCNS of France. The Navy is also set to induct the first of the Scorpene in January and the remaining five at nine month intervals.
The Navy is critically short of submarines, the most potent naval platforms, with 14 operational platforms,  including one nuclear attack submarine leased from Russia. But with regular maintenance and high turnaround times the actual availability is much less.
A new plan to build the next line of submarines under Project-75I has been held up due to delay in formulating the guidelines for the proposed ‘strategic partnerships’ model under the Defence Procurement Procedure 2016,  which Mr. Parrikar said would be finalised very soon.
“It [strategic partnerships] has already been approved and the drafting of the chapters is under way. Approval is needed by the Defence Acquisition Council [DAC] and probably by the Cabinet as well as it has financial implications,” Mr. Parrikar said, adding that once the strategic partnership model was approved Project-75I would be fast-tracked.
In this context, Mr. Parrikar called for higher level of indigenisation in submarine building. “Indigenisation in Scorpenes is not up to the mark but in the Advanced Technology Vessel [ATV] programme [nuclear submarines], it is over 70 per cent,” he observed.

 thehindu

November 21, 2016

Largest-ever 'Made-in-India' warship INS Chennai commissioned


INS Chennai, a Kolkata-class destroyer ship, was commissioned into the Indian Navy's combat fleet on Monday.  Defence minister Manohar Parrikar today commissioned the warship at the naval dockyard in Mumbai.  INS Chennai is the largest-ever warship to be built in India.  Built at the Mazagon Dock Shipbuilders Ltd in Mumbai, the ship's construction also marks the end of the Project 15A to build Kolkata-class guided missile destroyers.  Chief of the Naval Staff, Admiral Sunil Lanba, was also present on the occasion.
 "The ship is equipped with a decoy that can divert a missile attack. Nearly 60% of the ship was built at Mazagon Dock, while weapons and sensors were brought from Israel and Russia. Destroyers are second only to aircraft carriers in projecting raw combat power," said an official.  "The ship is designed to carry and operate up to two multi-role combat helicopters," said vice-admiral Girish Luthra (chief of naval command western command).  The Navy plans to become a 200-warship force with around 600 aircraft and helicopters by 2027.
 INS Chennai will be placed under the operational and administrative control of the Western Naval Command.  The ship will undergo certain additional sea trials of the ship-borne systems before being assigned to the Western Fleet and based in Mumbai. INS Chennai is 164 metres long with a displacement of over 7,500 tonnes, and sails at a top speed of over 30 knots (around 55 kms) per hour.
 Armed with supersonic surface-to-surface BrahMos missiles and Barak-8 Long Rang Surface-to-Air missiles, its undersea warfare capability includes indigenously developed anti-submarine weapons and sensors, prominently the hull-mounted sonar HUMSA-NG, heavyweight torpedo tube launchers, rocket launchers and towed array sonar capability.

For defence against enemy missiles, INS Chennai is fitted with 'Kavach' chaff decoy system and for protection from enemy torpedoes, has 'Mareech' torpedo decoy system, both developed in India.

A potent platform capable of undertaking a variety of tasks and missions spanning the full spectrum of maritime warfare, she can carry and operated two multi-role helicopters. INS Chennai is propelled by a powerful combined gas and propulsion plant consisting of four reversible gas turbines.


Her very high level of automation with sophisticated digital networks on board includes ATM-based integrated ship data network, combat management systems, automatic power management system and auxiliary control system.The ship's crest depicts the outline of the iconic Fort St George of Chennai in the background, a part of the adjacent beach and a sloop on blue and white waves.

The crew of the ship abides by the Sanskrit motto 'Shatro Sanharaka' meaning Vanquisher of Enemies, epitomizing the warrior spirit and strong resolve to prevail and succeed in combat.
- timesofindia